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Learn About the Human Anatomy

Understanding the body and how structures relate to each other can make it easier to understand why we feel pain in certain parts of the body, what is happening, and how to potentially avoid certain injuries which can lead to pain.

Central Nervous System

The Central Nervous System, also known as the CNS, consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The primary role of the central nervous system is twofold: 1) Integrate and coordinate incoming and outgoing neural signals and 2) Control higher mental functions such as thinking and leaning.

Read more about the Central Nervous System   Read More

Anatomy of the Spinal Cord

The spinal cord is responsible to sending signals from throughout the body to the brain to be processed. Every nerve in your hands and feet will feed into larger nerves (like the median nerve that goes through the carpal tunnel or the sciatic nerve in the leg) that ultimately ends up in the spinal cord.

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Facet Joints

Facets are small joints in the bony part of the spine. When we “crack” our neck or low back, that popping sounds is coming from the facet joints. They can become painful and inflammed like any other joint in the body. These facets run the entire length of the spine – from the head all the way to the low back.

Read more about the Facet Joints   Read More

Intervertebral Discs

We’ve all heard about the discs in the spine – whether it be a slipped disc, a bulging disc or a herniated one. They are responsible for allowing movement in the spine and providing cushion much like a shock absorbers in a car. When a disc becomes injured or weak, it can push into the spinal cord or a nearby nerve causing pain.

Read more about the Intervertebral Discs   Read More

Sympathetic Nervous System

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is responsible for our “fight or flight” response. It controls our blood flow, food digestion and even the transmission of pain. The SNS can send painful signals to the brain even when there is no obvious injury.

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Ligaments, Tendons & Muscles

Ligaments and tendons are the glue that hold our body together. The muscles are what allow us to move. When these structures are injured, it can become difficult to walk, stand, sit, kneel down, or raise your arm over your head. Injuries to them tend to linger and are difficult to heal.

Read more about the Ligaments, Tendons & Muscles   Read More

Related Content

Sitting Can Make Your Low Back Pain Worse

Sitting for long periods of time with the same posture, as you would in an office chair, can worsen existing back pain. It increases stress on the shoulders, arms and legs. A static posture also applies continuous pressure to disks and back muscles. Setting up an ergonomically correct workstation is crucial, but not enough. Stay active, every half hour get up and stretch or walk around the office.

What Causes Neuropathy?

Neuropathy can be caused by a seemingly endless group of factors. Genetics, injury, disease and environmental agents all can potentially contribute. Click below for a more detailed discussion on the causes and pathology of neuropathic pain.

Better Living Through Chemistry

IV Infusion is an easy and painless therapy which might be an option for you if you suffer from chronic pain that has not responded to medication or traditional treatment. It has been shown to be effective at treating fibromyalgia, small fiber neuropathy, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD). In it, medications are mixed with saline in an IV bag and slowly infused into your system.

Did You Remember to Stretch?

Stretching before exercise or strenuous physical activity can increase your performance, but more importantly, it can also limit the risk of injury. Stretching improves flexibility and range of motion in your joints. When your joints are enabled to move through their full range of motion, your muscles work more effectively.

Learn About the Human Anatomy

Understanding the body and how structures relate to each other can make it easier to understand why we feel pain in certain parts of the body, what is happening, and how to potentially avoid certain injuries which can lead to pain.

Central Nervous System

The Central Nervous System, also known as the CNS, consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The primary role of the central nervous system is twofold: 1) Integrate and coordinate incoming and outgoing neural signals and 2) Control higher mental functions such as thinking and leaning.

Read more about the Central Nervous System   Read More

Spinal Cord

We’ve all heard about the discs in the spine – whether it be a slipped disc, a bulging disc or a herniated one. They are responsible for allowing movement in the spine and providing cushion much like a shock absorbers in a car. When a disc becomes injured or weak, it can push into the spinal cord or a nearby nerve causing pain.

Read more about the Intervertebral Discs   Read More

Facet Joints

Facets are small joints in the bony part of the spine. When we “crack” our neck or low back, that popping sounds is coming from the facet joints. They can become painful and inflammed like any other joint in the body. These facets run the entire length of the spine – from the head all the way to the low back.

Read more about the Facet Joints   Read More

Intervertebral Discs

We’ve all heard about the discs in the spine – whether it be a slipped disc, a bulging disc or a herniated one. They are responsible for allowing movement in the spine and providing cushion much like a shock absorbers in a car. When a disc becomes injured or weak, it can push into the spinal cord or a nearby nerve causing pain.

Read more about the Intervertebral Discs   Read More

Sympathetic Nervous System

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is responsible for our “fight or flight” response. It controls our blood flow, food digestion and even the transmission of pain. The SNS can send painful signals to the brain even when there is no obvious injury.

Read more about the Sympathetic Nervous System   Read More

Ligaments, Tendons & Muscles

Ligaments and tendons are the glue that hold our body together. The muscles are what allow us to move. When these structures are injured, it can become difficult to walk, stand, sit, kneel down, or raise your arm over your head. Injuries to them tend to linger and are difficult to heal.

Read more about the Ligaments, Tendons & Muscles   Read More

Get Answers to Your Questions at the Ainsworth Institute

The key to finding the proper treatment for any type of pain is getting a proper diagnosis.  Not all types of pain respond to the same treatments and the window for improvement can be limited. The experts at Ainsworth Institute offer the most advanced pain management treatments available today, including advanced clinical trials that aren’t yet available to the general public. Call us today for an appointment so we can get you started on your road to recovery.

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